PDA

View Full Version : Studying Law in Spain (in Spanish)



Unregistered
12-21-2008, 05:36 AM
hello,

Ok, basically I have a degree in Politics from the University of Glasgow, Scotland. I am considering studying Law and thinking about doing it in Spain as I love the country.

I studied Spanish in university as well and I am (more or less) fluent. I studied in Barcelona for a year doing Erasmus so I hope I would be able to get on ok again.

How long would a law degree in Spain take?

How much would it cost at a public university?

Are there any opportunities to do a fast-track graduate course?

Finally, perhaps the most important question. Would it be easier to do my degree in Scotland and then qualify in Spain later on?

gracias!!

Lawbird Lawyer
12-22-2008, 11:39 AM
Dear Sir/Madam,


Further to your query, I address the points you raise:-


How long would a law degree in Spain take?

The Law degree used to be 5 years although with the new reforms it has been reduced in many universities to a 4 years degree.

How much would it cost at a public university?

In a public university you will only have to pay the matrícula, the rest is free. The matrícula can be several hundred euros.

Are there any opportunities to do a fast-track graduate course?

Not that I am aware of.

Finally, perhaps the most important question. Would it be easier to do my degree in Scotland and then qualify in Spain later on?

The UK follows the case law system, in Spain we follow the continental system. They are both very different systems. A law degree is Glasgow will leave you ill prepared -to put it mildly- to act as a lawyer in Spain.

UK solicitors acting in Spain, unless they have a Spanish Law degree, only have very limited market nieches to work in. It's much easier for a German lawyer for example to understand and practise fully Spanish law than a UK solicitor because of the difference in systems.

Unregistered
12-23-2008, 02:56 AM
ok, thanks a lot for getting back to me!

I am new to Law in general and so did not realise there was such as a difference.

However, I am considering moving to Spain in any case.

Thank you,

Peter

Lawbird Lawyer
12-23-2008, 10:11 AM
You're welcome Peter.

I wish you good luck.

Regards,

Unregistered
02-06-2009, 10:14 PM
Hello,

I hold a law degree from Canada (continental European law i.e., civilian system).
I would like to know how to get accredited in Spain in order to qualify there to become a 'Spanish' lawyer.

Would anyone know which administrative body I have to contact?
What are the chances of my foreign degree being recognised there?

Thank you.

Foreign Lawyer

Lawbird Lawyer
02-09-2009, 01:42 PM
Dear colleague,

The best thing would be for you to contact one of the Spanish Bar Associations (Colegio de Abogados) which will explain in detail the necessary steps that you must take to homologate your degree in Law.

It would be advisable you contact the Bar Association of the province you wish to work in.

Regards,

Unregistered
03-22-2009, 10:19 PM
Hola,

Please can you tell me the steps in order for a dual qualified barrister (UK common-law and another non-European mixed civil jurisdiction) to become qualified to work as a lawyer in Spain? Is there a particular European route?

What if your Spanish language skills are elementary?

How much does qualifying cost; How long does it take and what is the best/quickest method?

Is Law School in Madrid obligatory? Is there a Law School in Barcelona?

Muchas Gracias

Lawbird Lawyer
03-23-2009, 10:13 AM
Dear colleague,

Please can you tell me the steps in order for a dual qualified barrister (UK common-law and another non-European mixed civil jurisdiction) to become qualified to work as a lawyer in Spain? Is there a particular European route?

Once you've decided in which part of Spain you want to settle and work in you must contact the local Bar Association to have your law degree homologated. You will not have to pass any exams.

It takes on average 12 months. After that you will be able to join your local Bar Association as become a practising solicitor.


What if your Spanish language skills are elementary?

That will be a major setback as you can imagine all laws are passed in Spanish and very few are actually available in English language.

But don't let this deter you, there are many practising UK barristers working in Spain beside all the dually qualified lawyers allowed to practise both in the UK and in Spain.

How much does qualifying cost; How long does it take and what is the best/quickest method?

It takes on average 12 months. As explained above, you should contact the Bar association where you plan to settle and work in. Spain is a diverse country compromised of 17 autonomous regions and each of them have thier own rules besides the common laws.

Is Law School in Madrid obligatory? Is there a Law School in Barcelona?

No it isn't but it will be in a few years time. All lawyers will be requires to pass an exam to become practising lawyers. A Law school (Escuela de Práctica Jurídica) which compements the five year law degree is advisable albeit not mandatory.

Muchas Gracias

¡De nada!

Unregistered
05-07-2009, 08:56 PM
Thank you. This is the most helpful forum I've seen so far on this subject. How can I contact a local Bar Association in Spain. Cant seem to find anything on the net. Any help would be great.




Dear colleague,

Please can you tell me the steps in order for a dual qualified barrister (UK common-law and another non-European mixed civil jurisdiction) to become qualified to work as a lawyer in Spain? Is there a particular European route?

Once you've decided in which part of Spain you want to settle and work in you must contact the local Bar Association to have your law degree homologated. You will not have to pass any exams.

It takes on average 12 months. After that you will be able to join your local Bar Association as become a practising solicitor.


What if your Spanish language skills are elementary?

That will be a major setback as you can imagine all laws are passed in Spanish and very few are actually available in English language.

But don't let this deter you, there are many practising UK barristers working in Spain beside all the dually qualified lawyers allowed to practise both in the UK and in Spain.

How much does qualifying cost; How long does it take and what is the best/quickest method?

It takes on average 12 months. As explained above, you should contact the Bar association where you plan to settle and work in. Spain is a diverse country compromised of 17 autonomous regions and each of them have thier own rules besides the common laws.

Is Law School in Madrid obligatory? Is there a Law School in Barcelona?

No it isn't but it will be in a few years time. All lawyers will be requires to pass an exam to become practising lawyers. A Law school (Escuela de Práctica Jurídica) which compements the five year law degree is advisable albeit not mandatory.

Muchas Gracias

¡De nada!

Lawbird Lawyer
05-11-2009, 02:24 PM
Thank you for your kind words.

Which of the 83 regional Bar Associations existing in Spain do you want the contact details for? Please specify and I'll reply giving their contact details.

I guess it's the local Bar Association in which you plan to settle in Spain.

Unregistered
05-12-2009, 01:57 PM
I am an Argentinean lawyer working in an English law firm in Greece.

Could you please let me know which steps I must follow in order to qualify as a lawyer in Spain. Is it necessary to homolagate my Argentinean law degree first?

I should be grateful if you could also provide me with the contact details of the Bar Association in Madrid.

Muchas gracias.

Erica

Lawbird Lawyer
05-13-2009, 10:09 AM
Dear Erica,

Yes, you will have to homologate your Law Degree in Spain.

The contact details for the ICAM are:

Ilustre Colegio Abogados de Madrid

C/. Serrano, 9-11
28001-Madrid
España
Internet: http://www.icam.es
E-mail: icam@icam.es

Servicio de Atención Telefónica

Horario de atención al público:
Lunes a viernes: 08:00 a 20:00 horas
Sábados: 09:00 a 13:45 horas, desde el 1 de octubre hasta el 31 de mayo
Tfno: 91-788-93-80
91-435-78-10
Fax: 91-431-76-47
E-mail: sat@icam.es

Unregistered
05-14-2009, 10:20 AM
Many thanks for your prompt reply.

I am sure that I will be contacting you in the future with more queries!!

All the best

Erica

Lawbird Lawyer
05-14-2009, 01:07 PM
You're welcome Erica.

Regards

Unregistered
07-08-2009, 07:06 PM
hello all,
My name is Maxx and I am from Illinois. I am a little more than a semester away from completing my history degree with a minor international studies. I am hoping to get a job teaching English in Spain after graduation. Law has always been a huge interest to me. I have seriously considered law school in the US but I really want to live in Spain or Latin America. Would my degree qualify me to take the local exams in Spain? Also, I guess I should point out that my Spanish is quite good. My tongue is a bit slow at times but I can pick up any Spanish text and read it without issue.

Thanks,
Maxx

amsabeti
07-15-2009, 06:51 AM
Hi,

I just recently graduated and now hold a BA in Economics and BA in Spanish. I have always wanted to pursue law, but after living in Spain for 6 months I fell in love with it and would like to work there. Which leads me to my question, are there any american or english law universities in spain or can I study law in the US and then move to spain, or are there any other english speaking law universities that are in Europe that people attend and then move to practice in spain. I guess my overall question is whether its beneficial for me to obtain my degree in the US/Europe or in Spain and if in Spain, what schools are recommended. Thank you!

Lawbird Lawyer
07-15-2009, 12:01 PM
hello all,
My name is Maxx and I am from Illinois. I am a little more than a semester away from completing my history degree with a minor international studies. I am hoping to get a job teaching English in Spain after graduation. Law has always been a huge interest to me. I have seriously considered law school in the US but I really want to live in Spain or Latin America. Would my degree qualify me to take the local exams in Spain? Also, I guess I should point out that my Spanish is quite good. My tongue is a bit slow at times but I can pick up any Spanish text and read it without issue.

Thanks,
Maxx

Dear Maxx,

Unfortunately we are not specialised in these education matters.

You can however check with a government web which is in English that will explain how to convalidate your foreign degree in Spain:

http://web.micinn.es/contenido.asp?menu1=4&menu2=6&menu3=&dir=04_Universidades/022EdUnSu/06@Titulaciones/031HoDeTi&idioma=en

Lawbird Lawyer
07-15-2009, 12:13 PM
Hi,

I just recently graduated and now hold a BA in Economics and BA in Spanish. I have always wanted to pursue law, but after living in Spain for 6 months I fell in love with it and would like to work there. Which leads me to my question, are there any american or english law universities in spain or can I study law in the US and then move to spain, or are there any other english speaking law universities that are in Europe that people attend and then move to practice in spain. I guess my overall question is whether its beneficial for me to obtain my degree in the US/Europe or in Spain and if in Spain, what schools are recommended. Thank you!

Dear Sir/Madam,

If you intend to practice in Spain as a lawyer you will need to study a Spanish Law degree which, as it stand to logic, will be in Spanish.

There are no universities offering a Spanish Law degree in English.

You can however study Law in say England and come over to practice in Spain. The legal system is completely different as you will soon find out and you would be incapable of doing almost anything legal in Spain. This is because Anglosaxon countries follow the Case Law system.

Whereas as most European countries follow the Continental system. So for example a German lawyer can indeed set a law firm and practice in Spain as both legal systems are related. Germans have the BGB, Bürgerliches Gesetz Büch, and we have the Código Civil. In English & Welsh Law there is no equivalent. And this is core to practising Private Law in Spain for example.

So bottom line, if you are from the US unless you obtain your Law degree from the State of Louisiana, which for historical reasons follows our system, you will have to come over to Spain and study a Law degree in Spanish.

There are over 80 universities to choose from.

Yours faithfully,

Unregistered
07-15-2009, 10:41 PM
That is great, thank you very much. I have one more question though. Once I have my degree accepted as a Licenciado en Historia how does that effect my ability to study law in Spain? I thought I understood that once a law degree or bachelor's was attained a person could take the local bar exams. Then I started to think that it was a 5 year law program AFTER the bachleor's (or its equivilant). Yet another source made law school in Spain seem like a 2 years master's program. I'm sorry to bother you with questions. I'm just trying to figure all of this out.

Thanks again
Maxx

Lawbird Lawyer
07-16-2009, 11:51 AM
Dear Maxx,

You're welcome.

There is no Bar exam.

If you want to be a practising lawyer in Spain you will need to earn a Law degree in a Spanish university, study in a Law practice school and then join the Bar Association.

A degree in History does not qualify to become a lawyer.

Alternatively you can study law in a country following the Continental system and then homologate your degree in Spain and practise here.

Yours faithfully,

Unregistered
07-17-2009, 12:26 AM
Excellent, thank you! That is very interesting though. I am going to try to find an online continental law degree.

Unregistered
12-30-2009, 01:04 AM
hi to everyone.

i have a law degree(civilian backround)and practise for 1 year in turkey.so here is my guestion if i move to spain can i work as a lawyer in there?if i can should i have to do llm before working?pls i cant speak spanish.take care:)

Unregistered
01-12-2010, 12:38 PM
hi.

im new to this blog.. and i have find intresting information.. im advocate form Pakistan and i was intrested to study L.L.M from Spain ..and i hold good command in Spanish language.. my question is that can i get admission in L.L.M directly or i have to give some test to qualify for it. and do my L.L.B degree is recognize by Spain.

Regards.

Azher Rafiq ( puede hablar bien espanol..me podeis responderme en espanol )

Lawbird Lawyer
01-12-2010, 12:50 PM
Dear Sir,

You do not have to qualify to take on a LL.M in Spain. It is not required.

Your LL.B. will not be recognized in Spain unless you homologate it first.

Please follow the instructions of the Foreign affairs department on this matter:

homolgate your degree to spain (http://www.marbella-lawyers.com/forums/showthread.php?t=769)
sarahmorrison


Yours faithfully,

Azher.sanjrani
01-14-2010, 05:34 PM
Dear LawBird.

Thanks for the reply. so its mean that i can apply for L.L.M in spain universities.

Thanks


Yours faithfully,[/QUOTE]

Lawbird Lawyer
01-14-2010, 05:43 PM
Dear Sir,

You´re welcome.

You will be required to hold an LL.B. or equivalent buy you will not be required to pass any "tests" as you write. After all, it's you who will be paying over 30,000€ for a full time course.

They will probably require proficiency in GMAT tests (min score of 630) or Spanish language tests, 2 or 3 year's working experience etc..the normal. But there´s no knowledge test or anything like it.

To start you off, you can browse the following web page which lists various LL.M's and you can click further on the individual requirements that need to be met on application.

http://www.llm-guide.com/spain/1

But if you want to work in Spain as a qualified lawyer, you will need to have your LL.B. homologated, as per my prior e-mail above.

Yours faithfully,

SA Lawyer
01-22-2010, 11:50 AM
Dear Lawbird Lawyer,

I have read the above chain with some interest as some of the issues you cover relate to my current situation. It seems that you are very clued up and I’d very much appreciate your advice on the following.

I am a South African qualified lawyer with an LLM from The Netherlands. I’m living in Madrid at the moment and want to homologate my LLB. I phoned the Colegio de Abogados here in Madrid, and they were most unhelpful to say the least. According to them this is something this only dealt with by the Ministry of Education.

When I phoned the Ministry, they explained the process by which I could homologate my LLB and said that it could take up to a year and a half to process, but that they could not guarantee that they would homologate it. I’ve also spoken to a girl from Colombia who said she had her degree homologated, but had to do extra exams in the case of subjects required in Spain but which were adjudged not to form part of her law curriculum in Colombia.

Now I assume Colombia is a civil law jurisdiction similar to Spain. So it would seem strange if she had to do extra exams but I didn’t considering that I come from a common law country with laws similar to England, the US, Australia etc…

I don’t mind doing a few extra exams, but what I’m deadly afraid of is waiting a year and a half and then finding out I have to do a substantial amount of my degree again!

Do you think this likely? I take it you have knowledge of persons from common law countries who have homologated their degrees.

Any light you could shed on this, would be much, much appreciated

Thanks.

Lawbird Lawyer
01-22-2010, 12:16 PM
Dear colleague,

Thank you for your kind words.

You've been well-informed. As per my prior posts, it's the Ministry of Education the competent public body in Spain to homologate a foreign degree:

Homologate your degree in Spain (http://www.educacion.es/educacion/sistema-educativo/convalidaciones.html)

In reply to your question, I do know many lawyers who attained their degrees in Common Law countries i.e. England & Wales, and homologated them sucessfully. As you've been advised, always the red tape, homologation typically takes on average between one year and half and three years and it's discretionary.

I doubt you will be expected to take any exams. The practical problem you will find on practising law in Spain once you've successfully homologated your Law degree is that lawyers who come from the Common Law System are at a loss when it comes to our national laws. Basically you will be a layman requiring years upon years to learn and master your particular area of expertise.

Which explains why most of these lawyers don't really practice law in Spain and act more as high-profile PR's for their law firms organising focus seminars and conferences in hotels aimed to solicit fellow countrymen. The grunt work is actually carried out normally by their Spanish counterparts as it's normal. It's really not their fawlt as the legal systems differ so greatly. They are just practical about it and bridge the gap between Spanish laws and their countrymen.

There are lawyers who are exceptions to the above general rule, of course. There are areas of expertise, i.e International Law, International Arbitration, that can easily bypass this problem and you will probably even have more of a competitive edge than a Spanish lawyer.

Lawyers who really do practise law in Spain on day-to-day basis after having homologated their degrees are normally all those who have a Continental Law academical background i.e. German lawyers. Their Bürgeliches Gesetzbuch and our Civil Code (backbone of our legal system) for example are similar of sorts; they are already well-acquainted with grasping the core concepts of our laws and can perform admirably well in Spain.


Yours faithfully,

SA Lawyer
01-22-2010, 12:59 PM
Thank you very much for your quick and thorough response.

A potential three year wait is intimidating, but I do have a Masters in International Law, and that is the field I would like to persue in the long term at any rate. So I think I'm in a position to wait it out - assuming of course I can find work in my field!

Thanks again for your advice.

I wish you well.

Lawbird Lawyer
01-22-2010, 01:08 PM
You're welcome.

Don't let me put you off just because of the 3 year delay (that really was the worst case scenario). In Spain these things do take their time so 2 years perhaps is more in line with what they'll take. Patience is a plus!

I wish you the best of luck in your professional endeavour.

Regards

Unregistered
02-11-2010, 02:49 PM
Dear Lawbird Lawyer,

I am a law post-graduate from England. I have a LL.B degree and have completed the Legal Practice Course (diploma in legal practice which is our vocational training in England). But have not completed my training here.

I am interested in qualifying as a lawyer in Spain. I have read all the previous threads on this topic.

What is actually meant by 'homologating' a degree. Does this just mean that my qualifications which be checked in Spain to ensure that I do not need to take any more exams?

I understand that Spain has the continental system. So most of the work in Spain is carried out by Spanish lawyers. With the lawyers who come from a case law background acting as "high profile PRs". The exception to this rule being that those who have a background in International Law being able to practise as lawyers beside their Spanish counterparts. Are there foreign firms in Spain/ vacancies to enable the lawyers from a case law background to work as actual lawyers in Spain?

Am I right in understanding that in order for me to practice as a 'lawyer' of some description all I need to do is register with the Bar Association of the area in which I wish to work and preferably I should be fluent in Spanish? So that no more exams need to be taken at the current time? But in a few years time law graduates will be required to sit an exam in order to be registered with a Bar Association. Do you know when this new regulation will come into force?

Many thanks,

Dina

Lawbird Lawyer
02-11-2010, 03:20 PM
Dear Dina,

Many questions.

First of all let me clarify that law firms in Spain are more than eager to hire lawyers from a case law background, that does not deter them. It falls on you to decide if you can actually practice law confidently in Spain or not and ultimately it will also fall on the market to decide your abilities as well following on your track record. No one will require you to take an exam to homologate your Law degree in Spain. As I wrote it's merely an administrative issue that takes a while spanning normally 2-3 years.

If after you've homologated your degree you feel confident that you can, for example, litigate in Spain and speak before Spanish judges and magistrates in lower and higher courts and draft 50 page long law suits quoting jurisprudence, by all means do it. There are no restrictions other than your own abilities.

The problem is that if you don't do it well you stand the chance of being sued for professional negligence which ultimately may lead you to being struck of the Bar Association.

It's not really an outside imposition of any sorts, it's quite simply that case law lawyers realise their limitations and would rather focus their energy tapping on market niches which are barred normally to Spanish lawyers for whatever reason i.e. language barrier. Normally case law lawyers work in tandem with their Spanish counterparts for this very reason as it's logical.

Bottom line, the only limitations that you will find to practice are your own. You can register freely at any Bar Association you wish and practice in any part of Spain. After a recent change in law, you are no longer required to join the regional Bar Association where you practice. i.e. you can join Madrid's now and practice in Málaga if you wish. Moreover, now you do not even have to communicate this change as opposed to very recently. Mastering Spanish is logically a plus as all laws and legal documents will be in Spanish or in one of Spain's other co-official languages. Having said that, many foreign lawyers make a tidy living in Spain and they are not bilingual.

Regarding taking an exam to obtain a practising certificate in Spain this will be approved within the next years to weed off unsuitable candidates. There is no definitive timeframe yet.

Homologating simply means they will check that you attained a valid law degree in your home country and they will now allow you to practice in Spain. No exams need to be taken, at least yet.

I wish you good look in your professional future.

Regards,

Unregistered
02-11-2010, 03:46 PM
Dear Lawbird Lawyer,

Thank you very much for your reply. It was very helpful.

Regards,

Dina

Unregistered
02-25-2010, 08:02 AM
I was just wondering from reading the posts above how long Spanish students spend studying and/or training before qualifying as a lawyer i.e. from the time they enter university until the time they are admitted as lawyers? I always find that interesting when mutual recognition questions are raised!

Lawbird Lawyer
02-25-2010, 08:59 AM
That hinges on their syllabus.

Older syllabus required 5 years, newer ones require only 4 years. During those years you can opt to work as an intern during the long summer holidays to gain experience in a law firm. In addition many lawyers upon graduating join a Law Practice School which typically lasts one or two years.

In Spain we do not have an equivalent of the UK's mandatory internship. Although this is bound to change in the near future where exam taking will become compulsory to obtain a Practising Certificate so as to weed out unsuitable candidates.

Unregistered
02-26-2010, 06:38 AM
thank you lawbird lawyer, very helpful on that last post

Lawbird Lawyer
02-26-2010, 08:56 AM
You are welcome.

Unregistered
05-13-2010, 07:33 PM
I have been reading the previous threads and am starting to get confused. I have a few queries and was wondering if someone could clarify:

I am an English qualified solicitor and have been practising for a number of years in the UK. I am now living in Barcelona and wish to practice here. I visited the law society in Barcelona and from what I can gather there are two routes available:

1- I can register with the law society and am able to practice without the need of 'homologating' my degree...but I would not be able to use the word 'abogada' behind my name - is this correct?

2 - I can work for a law firm in Barcelona and effectively qualify as a Spanish abogada, after a period of 3 years?

Is my understanding correct? I guess my query is how does a fully qualified solicitor qualify as a Spanish abogado/a?

Thanks

Dee

Lawbird Lawyer
05-14-2010, 09:46 AM
Dear Dee,

If you are unable to use the word "Abogada" you simply cannot practice Law in Spain. That's like saying you can practice Law in the UK but you cannot do any work reserved to Solicitors and/or Barristers. In other words, you would be a paralegal of sorts.

You simply need to homologate your Law degree before the Ministry of Education as I have explained in detail in all the previous threads to the best of my knowledge.

In any case, I want to clarify that this law firm does NOT give legal advice on homologating Law degrees in Spain NOR are we specialised in this legal field.

Once you've homologated your Law degree before the Ministry of Education, you may then join any of Spain's Bar Associations to obtain a practising number and you will be able to address yourself as "Abogada" in equal footing to other Spanish colleagues.

The other point you mention on working for 3 years for a law firm and then you becoming a fully qualified "Abogada" I've never heard of this. It could be that the region of Catalonia has its own rules to qualify as a lawyer. You should look onto this matter to verify if it's the case.

All queries on convalidating a degree should be addressed to Spain's Ministry of Education which is the one homologating them:

http://www.educacion.es/educacion/universidades/educacion-superior-universitaria/titulos/homologacion-titulos.html

Yours faithfully,

Unregistered
05-18-2010, 09:02 PM
Thanks for the info.

Unregistered
05-20-2010, 12:30 AM
Hi lawbird,

I must say you are an asset to this forum.

I am a Irish law graduate having complete a law degree, an LLM and qualifying as a NY lawyer.

Both I and a number of my colleagues are considering becoming attorneys in Spain. Do you know the specifics of going before the Education Committee to be homologated? What are the fees charged for homologating? Has the exam come in yet? Is there any way of speeding up the process?

One of the requirements I have heard is that you need the following:

1) Sworn Spanish translated versions of all degrees, masters, law qualifications etc if your degrees and transcipts are not originally in Spanish

Is this correct?

To the previous poster, UK lawyer, I believe you are correct under the EC Directive 98/5 under which lawyers/soliciitors can transfer from one jurisdiction to another. Under it's incorporation into national legislation, solicitors associations require a training period - ie where you are a paralegal for a few years. As part of this, the respective authority can also prevent you from practicing a particular type of law. For example, probate for the Paris Bar.


Kind regards
Anon

Lawbird Lawyer
05-20-2010, 10:15 AM
Hi Anon,

Thank you for your kind words.

First of all you are correct in the requirements you point out.

Currently in Spain, unlike other European countries, you do not need to pass a training period to qualify as a lawyer. You can attain a Law degree and immediately request to join one of Spain's regional Bar Associations to practice Law. However, serious law students join Law Practice Schools after attaining their Law degree which is an equivalent to a Master's degree (LL.M. in Law).

However, this is set to change in the near future as a new law, "Ley de Acceso a la Abogacía", is bound to be passed requiring an exam to be taken to qualify as a lawyer. It'll be an equivalent to your US Bar exam. It is still uncertain what this exam will consist on, as negotiations are ongoing. It has generated gerat controversy. But it seems it will consist on both multiple choice questions besides two practical cases. A Law graduate will be required to study additionally 100 credits in a period spaning two years before being able to take this exam.

The introduction of this new law will bring an unexpected consequence to the labor market. Between 2012 and 2013 there will be no Law graduates available in Spain to be recruited as they will all be studying the compulsory 2 year Master to take the Bar exam.

More on this new law:

http://www.expansion.com/2010/05/11/juridico/1273571937.html

Yours faithfully,

Anon
06-18-2010, 11:17 AM
Dear Lawbird,

Thank you very much for the update. That is very helpful. I have one more query.

In my research, I have come accross the difference between an abrogado and the 'Colegio de Procuradores'. From my understanding, while an abrogado can conduct legal work and call themselves an "Abrogado", they are not allowed to represent people in court. Only someone admitted to the 'Colegio de Procuradores' can represent people in court. Is that correct? or would I have to join both to respresent people in court?

I would be grateful if you could advise me what steps and what Province is relevant for me to be admitted to the appropriate Bar-Professional bodies in Spain for appointment as:

1] Abogado and the appropriate Colegio de Abogados.
[2] Colegio de Procuradores and the appropriate Consejo General de Ilustres Colegios de Procuradores de los Tribunales de España.


I have called and emailed icam.es and have received no response.

Many thanks in advance

kind regards
ANON

Lawbird Lawyer
06-18-2010, 11:26 AM
Dear Anon,

You are welcome.

A procurador is a court agent that liases between us, the lawyers who speak before the judge ruling the matter, and the law court. They do most of the required leg work, they do not defend the case before the judge, that is reserved to us. So basicalLy they act as a conveyance belt between lawyers and law courts.

Procuradors have also attained a Law degree.

Regarding me giving you the details of all the Bar Associations and Procurador Associations in Spain I could be posting here all morning long. They will all come up in a Google search.

If you want the contact details of one in particular, just let me know. You do realize there are 83 of them?

http://www.cgae.es/portalCGAE/printPortal.do?urlPagina=S001011001/es_ES.html

Yours faithfully,

Unregistered
09-02-2010, 09:36 AM
Hello Lawbird,

I would like to ask your opinion, what the best way in my situation..
I am from Lithuania (continentaly law system) and now I'm moving to live in Madrid. In Lithuania university I got master degree in law and then 2 years I worked for government as the civil servant in the position of lawyer. I have just started to learn spanish.
I understand, that I need to validate my diploma in Spain. But what are the best steps for me, if I wish as soon as possible to start practisize as a lawyer in Spain?
Can I find a law school (better, if it is not private), where I can study spanish and recognize with spanish law at the same time in Madrid? Is it possible? Or I must to learn fluently spanish and then go to law school in Madrid? Would you recommend the website, where I can find these law schools..

Thanks

Eva

Unregistered
09-07-2010, 03:29 PM
Hi! I am interested in contacting the colegio de abogados in Barcelona for the homologation. Could you help me get their contact details please. Thanks for your help.

Patricia
09-07-2010, 05:04 PM
Hello,

This is the website of the Ilustre Colegio de Abogados de Barcelona:

http://www.icab.cat

You can find there their contact details as well as other useful information.

Regards,

Unregistered
09-07-2010, 05:17 PM
thank you very much, that was so fast!

Unregistered
07-03-2012, 08:14 PM
Hello
I am a student from London, I am doing LLB Law and I just have completed my second year in uni. Next year will be my last and I will obtain LLB law degree and I plan to move in Madrid. Could you please help me with some info, what I have to do to become a lawyer in Spain? After the uni I will not be qualified in UK, as I have to pass the BPTC or LPC and then to complete 1-2 year work experience, my question is am I qualified in Spain just with LLB law degree? I will do my best to learn spanish language and also I would like to do LLM in Spain( if I could afford it financialy), but please help me to find the best route in Spain. I would like to practice Sports Law and if you could give me info about that it will be much appreciated! Thank you in advance!
Regards
Tammy

UMA
07-09-2012, 08:37 PM
If you are interested in practising law internationally and doing your university studies abroad, try looking at the program of combined Spanish law degree with English law studies at Malaga University in Spain: www.derecho.uma.es.com

UMA
07-09-2012, 08:40 PM
Sorry, I meant www.derecho.uma.es

Unregistered
08-15-2012, 12:41 PM
Try looking at www.derecho.uma.es and clicking on 'COMBINED PROGRAM OF SPANISH LAW DEGREE WITH ENGLISH LAW STUDIES'

Unregistered
09-04-2012, 04:02 PM
Thank you for the website you have provided, but this is for new students and it does not relate to me, as I am doing my final year in the uni. I just wanted to know, how I can prequalify in Spain with LLB Law Degree from UK. Can I do a Master Degree in Spain for example and then follow the spanish road to qualify as Spanish Lawyer? Your help is much appreciated! Thank you
Tammy

arez
10-29-2012, 02:58 PM
Dear Lawbird (I address this to Lawbird, but please if anyone has anything to say in relation to this, please do not hesitate),

as regards homologation of law degrees, is it necessary to have my degree homologated by the Spanish Ministry of Education if I have a 5 years law degree from EU country with continental system? Should not this degree be homologated automatically under EU rules on acknowledgement of degrees?

Thank you for your inputs.

Kind regards,

A.

Unregistered
07-05-2014, 05:31 PM
Hello,
Thank you in advance for your answer.
I hold a Bachelor of Laws from an EU country and a LLM in EU Law and I would like to practice law in Spain.
My question is: if I homologate my law degree will I have to pass an exam to be a lawyer in Spain? Or is it just a procedural step and after homologation I will earn the title abogado in Spain? Does this procedure suppose the fact that u have to pass some additional exams?

I know a law has been passed in 2011 which obliges Spanish students who graduate from law to pass an examination and to do a traineeship, but I am not aware of when this law will enter into force.

If I will qualify as a lawyer in my home country, in order to practice in Spain would I have to take any other exams?

Thanks in advance!

Unregistered
02-04-2015, 10:33 PM
Thank you for your kind words.

Which of the 83 regional Bar Associations existing in Spain do you want the contact details for? Please specify and I'll reply giving their contact details.

I guess it's the local Bar Association in which you plan to settle in Spain.


I think that all of your answers here have been brilliantly helpful, thank-you.
If it is not too much trouble, would you be able to provide me with contact details for the Bar Associations both in Madrid and Valencia?
Thanks once again.

Patricia
02-06-2015, 02:03 PM
Hello,

These are the details:

- Colegio de Abogados de Madrid (http://web.icam.es/)
- Colegio de Abogados de Valencia (http://www.icav.es/)

Regards,

Unregistered
05-22-2015, 12:46 AM
Buenas a todo!

I wonder whether someone here can help me with my query. I have checked lots of EU websites, Spanish government websites etc and I cannot find the answer to my question anywhere. I am English and qualified as a solicitor under English and Welsh law. I studied the Graduate Diploma in Law ('GDL') which is a one year intensive law course. If you go on to do the Legal Practice Course ('LPC'), another one year intensive course and a common route into a legal qualification, the GDL and LPC combined are considered as an 'LLB' and I have an official certificate confirming this. I believe that both courses together are deemed to have enough hours of study to justify this and it should be classified as an undergraduate degree under the Bologna process.

I know that the Spanish authorities will only homologate degrees of a certain length. Has anyone tried to homologate a GDL/LPC LLB qualification?

I am considering whether to study a Masters in Spanish at Malaga but if I cannot homologate my degree, then I am wondering what to do. I specialise in commercial/corporate and HNW/UHNW private client matters. My intention is to work on the Costa del Sol where there are a few international-focused law firms which cater for the expat populations. I know the area well, I have been living here since 2010 but I was working in Gibraltar. The commute is really too far for me so that is why I am trying to look at my options in Spain.

Any advice you can offer me would be very gratefully accepted.

Many thanks,

Amaltheia

nswlegal
05-22-2015, 12:36 PM
I wish I were able to leave a link to the source, but I can't. So, it'll have to be copy/paste. How to apply for recognition? At present there are two types of recognition (which are not compatible but, can be requested either consecutively or simultaneously):

Recognition of a degree from the Catalogue of official university qualifications (recognition as a specific qualification, such as a Bachelor’s Degree in Law or a Diploma in Physiotherapy). I guess, this is the one you need.

Procedure: What documents to show

The interested party sets the procedure in motion by completing the application form and submitting it together with the following documentation (do not hand over original documents as these will not be returned):

Certified copy[1] of the document that proves the identity and nationality of the applicant.
Certified copy of the degree the applicant seeks to validate or the corresponding certificate of issue.
Certified copy of the academic certification of the studies completed by the applicant to obtain the degree and which includes the official duration of the course in academic years, the course curriculum, subjects and number of hours devoted to each, among other information.[2]
Proof of payment of the corresponding tax: certified either by machine or by an authorised signature that accredits the payment, deposit or transfer to the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport.

Documents issued abroad must fulfil the following requisites:

They must be official documents that have been issued by the authorities responsible for doing so in accordance with the legislation of the country in question.
Before being submitted, documents must be authenticated either by the applicant’s embassy or, when applicable, by the Hague Convention Apostille This will not be required for documents issued by authorities in European Union Member States or countries that have signed the European Economic Area Agreement.
Documents must be accompanied, where applicable, by an official translation into Spanish.

The application form can be submitted and printed in two ways:

Electronic office Processes and Services[1]
By downloading the corresponding form from the web page of the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport.

Now the important part.
The purpose of professional recognition of qualifications is to overcome the obstacles that nationals from a State may encounter when attempting to start work in a given profession and lead to an authorisation to exercise a specific profession in the new State of residence. This is intended to support professionals rather than students. This legislation[1] applies exclusively to nationals of the 27 Member States of the European Union, the non-EU States that have signed the European Economic Area Agreement (Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein) and Switzerland.
Unfortunately, I think, being a Canadian, you might have a problem.

Good luck with it anyway. I hope I was of assistance. Appology for going at length.

Unregistered
03-03-2016, 11:29 PM
HI

I am preparing to study law in september in the UK but i would like to also work in spain with my law degree

but i have the option to study ba law with spanish law if i do that,would i be able to work in spain,also if i study just british law degree would i have to study again in spain

Unregistered
09-28-2016, 05:50 PM
Hello,

Can anyone tell me about the process of law school in Spain? I live in the US and want to move there after I graduate with my Undergraduate degree. Would it be better for me to go to law school here or go to Spain if I want to practice it there? I also speak Spanish, as it is my first language would I still have to take Spanish classes?

Thank you very much for your responses.